Sewanee DMin, Year 2 – Complete

As of this morning, I have handed in all of the assignments required during my second summer as a student in Sewanee’s DMin degree track in the Advanced Degrees Program.  Since a couple of people have asked to read a paper or two, I’m utilizing this blog to post them.

Mapping Ritual Structures – Course taught by The Rt. Rev. Dr. Neil Alexander, Dean of the School of Theology and The Rev. Dr. Jim Turrell, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.  This class had the option of two fifteen page papers: one on rites of initiation and one of the Eucharist or one thirty page paper on either topic.  I chose the write a thirty page paper entitled “Why The Anaphora of Addai and Mari Matters”

The Oxford Movement, the Liturgy and the Crisis of Faith – Course taught by The Rev. Dr. Benjamin King, Director of the Advanced Degrees Program.  This class had two assignments.  The first was a 4-5 page practical paper on the Oxford Movement’s influence on your parish.  In order to understand this paper, you probably should look at The Cambridge Camden Society’s 1841 tract “A Few Words to Church Builders.”  My paper is entitled, “The Oxford Movement and Saint Paul’s Foley: Unusual Bedfellows.”  The second assignment was a 10-12 research page paper on a person, movement or topic from the course.  Dr. King will most likely serve as my thesis adviser, and his suggestion was that this paper serve as a precis for that larger project dealing with William Reed Huntington’s The Church Idea (1870) and what Brian McLaren calls “The Episcopal Moment.” (2008/9).  This paper is called, “Poised for Success: William Reed Huntington’s Church of the Reconciliation to Seize the Episcopal Moment.

Thanks to my wife and daughter for putting up with me over the past six weeks, to my Rector for picking up my slack, and to the people of Saint Paul’s for being supportive of my academic musings.

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